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Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards 
Please review the complete instructions on attached document.

**THIS DISCUSSION IS DIVIDE IN TWO PARTS –

0. MAIN DISCUSSION POST BY TUESDAY 03/30/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM EST

0. TWO REPLIES BY FRIDAY 04/02/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM EST

Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards

When you wake in the morning, you may reach for your cell phone to reply to a few text or email messages that you missed overnight. On your drive to work, you may stop to refuel your car. Upon your arrival, you might swipe a key card at the door to gain entrance to the facility. And before finally reaching your workstation, you may stop by the cafeteria to purchase a coffee.
From the moment you wake, you are in fact a data-generation machine. Each use of your phone, every transaction you make using a debit or credit card, even your entrance to your place of work, creates data. It begs the question: How much data do you generate each day? Many studies have been conducted on this, and the numbers are staggering: Estimates suggest that nearly 1 million bytes of data are generated every second for every person on earth.
As the volume of data increases, information professionals have looked for ways to use big data—large, complex sets of data that require specialized approaches to use effectively. Big data has the potential for significant rewards—and significant risks—to healthcare. In this Discussion, you will consider these risks and rewards.

To Prepare:

· Review the Resources and reflect on the web article Big Data Means Big Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs. – Please see attached article
· Reflect on your own experience with complex health information access and management and consider potential challenges and risks you may have experienced or observed.

Instructions

1. Post a description of at least one potential benefit of using big data as part of a clinical system and explain why. 2
2. Describe at least one potential challenge or risk of using big data as part of a clinical system and explain why.
3. Propose at least one strategy you have experienced, observed, or researched that may effectively mitigate the challenges or risks of using big data you described. Be specific and provide examples.

**At least 3 references** – one of them form the article for the resources.

**THIS DISCUSSION IS DIVIDE IN TWO PARTS

1.

MAIN DISCUSSION POST BY TUESDAY 03/
30
/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM
EST

2.

TWO REPLIES BY FRIDAY
04/02
/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM EST

Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards

When you wake in the morning, you may reach for your cell phone to reply to a few text
or email messages that you missed overnight. On your drive to work, you may stop to
refuel your car. Upon your
arrival, you might swipe a key card at the door to gain
entrance to the facility. And before finally reaching your workstation, you may stop by
the cafeteria to purchase a coffee.

From the moment you wake, you are in fact a data

generation machine. Each us
e of
your phone, every transaction you make using a debit or credit card, even your entrance
to your place of work, creates data. It begs the question: How much data do you
generate each day? Many studies have been conducted on this, and the numbers are
st
aggering: Estimates suggest that nearly 1 million bytes of data are generated every
second for every person on earth.

As the volume of data increases, information professionals have looked for ways to use
big data

large, complex sets of data that require s
pecialized approaches to use
effectively. Big data has the potential for significant rewards

and significant risks

to
healthcare. In this Discussion, you will consider these risks and rewards.

To Prepare:

·

Review the Resources and reflect on the web article

Big Data Means Big
Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs
.

Please
see
attached

a
rticle

·

Reflect on your own experience with complex health information access and
management and consider potential challenges and risks you may have
experienced or observed.

Instructions

1.

Post a
descripti
on of at least one potential benefit of using big data as part of a
clinical system and explain why.
2

2.

D
escribe at least one potential challenge or risk of using big data as part of a
clinical system and explain why.

3.

Propose at least one strategy you h
ave experienced, observed, or researched
that may effectively mitigate the challenges or risks of using big data you
described.
Be specific and provide examples
.

**
At
least

3 references
**

one of them form
the

article for
the

resources
.

**THIS DISCUSSION IS DIVIDE IN TWO PARTS –

1. MAIN DISCUSSION POST BY TUESDAY 03/30/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM
EST

2. TWO REPLIES BY FRIDAY 04/02/2021 BEFORE 8:00 PM EST

Discussion: Big Data Risks and Rewards

When you wake in the morning, you may reach for your cell phone to reply to a few text
or email messages that you missed overnight. On your drive to work, you may stop to
refuel your car. Upon your arrival, you might swipe a key card at the door to gain
entrance to the facility. And before finally reaching your workstation, you may stop by
the cafeteria to purchase a coffee.
From the moment you wake, you are in fact a data-generation machine. Each use of
your phone, every transaction you make using a debit or credit card, even your entrance
to your place of work, creates data. It begs the question: How much data do you
generate each day? Many studies have been conducted on this, and the numbers are
staggering: Estimates suggest that nearly 1 million bytes of data are generated every
second for every person on earth.
As the volume of data increases, information professionals have looked for ways to use
big data—large, complex sets of data that require specialized approaches to use
effectively. Big data has the potential for significant rewards—and significant risks—to
healthcare. In this Discussion, you will consider these risks and rewards.
To Prepare:
 Review the Resources and reflect on the web article Big Data Means Big
Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs. – Please see attached article
 Reflect on your own experience with complex health information access and
management and consider potential challenges and risks you may have
experienced or observed.

Instructions
1. Post a description of at least one potential benefit of using big data as part of a
clinical system and explain why. 2
2. Describe at least one potential challenge or risk of using big data as part of a
clinical system and explain why.
3. Propose at least one strategy you have experienced, observed, or researched
that may effectively mitigate the challenges or risks of using big data you
described. Be specific and provide examples.

**At least 3 references** – one of them form the article for the resources.

3/29/2021 Big Data Means Big Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs | HealthLeaders Media

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs 1/3

BIG DATA MEANS BIG POTENTIAL,
CHALLENGES FOR NURSE EXECS

ANALYSIS  |  BY JENNIFER THEW RN  |   APRIL 19, 2016

To ensure big data is used to influence outcomes that are
meaningful to the nursing profession, nurse executives need to
act as data visionaries and architects.

Have you ever found yourself poring over stacks of data, feeling more like a statistician
than a nurse? If you have, welcome to the world of big data.

“You have all of these different data sources coming at you on a weekly, monthly,
quarterly basis. The CFO has a stack of data for you, your productivity-management
engineer people have a stack of data for you, HR has a stack of data for you, and then
your quality director, your clinical folks, have a stack of data for you,” says Jane
Englebright, RN, PhD, CEBP, FAAN, chief nursing executive and senior vice president at
Nashville, Tennessee-based HCA.

“And your job is to sort through all that data and synthesize it in some way and come up
with brilliant conclusions about how to run the organization.”

Big data “typically refers to a large complex data set that yields substantially more
information when analyzed as a fully integrated data set as compared to the outputs
achieved with smaller sets of the same data that are not integrated,” according to the

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/users/jennifer-thew-rn

3/29/2021 Big Data Means Big Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs | HealthLeaders Media

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs 2/3

Online Journal of Nursing Informatics.

Dealing with big data can understandably be challenging for chief nurse executives.

During a session titled, “The CNE Role in the Big Data Revolution,” at the American
Organization of Nurse Executives last month in Fort Worth, TX, Englebright and
healthcare management consultant Barbara Caspers, RN, MS, PHN, discussed
importance of shared strategies to help CNEs ready their organizations for the “big data
revolution.”

Drowning in Data

When a CNE is analyzing and synthesizing data, it’s typically done manually and is a
very time- and labor- intensive process, in part, because technology systems have
traditionally been built in silos. “Often they don’t even call the units the same thing.
They don’t name them the same thing. They don’t necessarily define them the same
way,” Englebright says.

For example, the definition of a day may vary from system to system and the way a
month is calculated in the finance systems may differ from how it is calculated in the
payroll system.  

Trying to “figure out how to keep up with your agency hours and what the cost of your
agency is in the finance system versus the scheduling system,” Englebright says, is “just
a nightmare, trying to make all of these different things sync.”

The lack of data standardization can also make it challenging for a CNE to assess how
the organization or a particular unit is performing and to make well-informed decisions
about what to change. Having good data is key to making effective changes.

“For those of us who grew-up studying the biological sciences, we understand that we
have taken a very linear, Newtonian-approach to data over something that’s really
much more like a biological system,” she explains. “When you perturb one part of our
system… it has ripple effects throughout the entire organization.”

Failure to recognize how this data interacts throughout the system has been a limitation
in the types of data analytics that have been put forth.

http://ojni.org/issues/?p=3081

http://www.aone.org/

3/29/2021 Big Data Means Big Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs | HealthLeaders Media

https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs 3/3

“The frustration that we often have as nurse leaders in looking at this data, is [that]
some of the variables we care about the most, aren’t even in the data,” Englebright
says. “We don’t have something that measures nursing competence, for example. We
don’t have something that measures how committed the nurses are. We don’t have
something that measures if the patient really [is] going to do the stuff we just invested
all this time in teaching them to do.”

Because of this, CNEs end up having to advocate for the things they care about in a
person-on-person debate, than being able to make a persuasive business case based
on data, she says.

Jennifer Thew, RN, is the senior nursing editor at HealthLeaders.

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