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Using “The Paper Menagerie” find an article about strained parent/child relationships in literature, or if you want to write about “August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains,” you might find an article about 20th-century dystopic short stories, or for “The Storm,” you might find an article about Acadian culture in Louisiana.
Now, you will write an individual annotated bibliographic entry for this source. Complete the following:

Begin with the MLA works cited entry for the text. Note that EbscoHost (in Galileo) will provide you with the MLA citation if you click “Cite” on the right-hand panel [and, scroll to the MLA entry]. And, also note that the works cited entry for the “Student-Selected Scholarly Articles” has been provided, in the “description” section (below the article’s title).  If you use a “Cite” button-generated citation, be sure to double-check the citation to ensure it is correctly formatted. This link shows you what a correct MLA 8th edition entry for a journal article found in a database should look like:  http://www.easybib.com/guides/citation-guides/mla-8/cite-journal-article-online-database-mla-8/
Then, write one well-developed paragraph that summarizes, synthesizes, and reflects on the source, using the outline below. Make sure that the paragraph contains specific information (not general observations that could apply to any source). Note that a single quote may be included—but the quote must be no more than one (fully) typed line.

Write 2-3 sentences that summarize the source’s main argument and claims; be specific when summarizing the text and include parenthetical citations when appropriate.
Write 2-3 sentences that evaluate what evidence and examples the source uses to support its main focus/claims.  Briefly explain the source’s merits—and/or deficiencies—in terms of logic, persuasion, credibility, etc.  Consider whether the author(s) effectively presented her/his/their claims—and how.  Keep in mind that your evaluation does not need to be only positive or negative; the source may be adept in certain areas, but not in others. 
Write 2-3 sentences that reflect on how you might use the article/source in your researched essay. Consider what new information you learned—and how the source “added” to the ongoing conversation about your topic. It may be helpful to imagine the author as a participant in an online discussion on the poem—what would she/he “say”?

For reference, consult these resources: Sample MLA annotations [note that this paragraph does not include the “reflection” information]; and Purdue OWL’s explanation of an annotated bibliography.

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