Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Advance, pharmacology, health assessment and Leadership (Due 24 hours) | Economics Write
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1) Minimum 6 full pages  (Follow the 3 x 3 rule: minimum three paragraphs per part)

Parts 1 and 2 are the same question, however you must answer both questions with references and different writing always addressing them objectively, that is, as if you were two different people. Similar responses in wording or references will not be accepted.

             Part 1: Minimum 1 page
             Part 2: minimum 1 page
             Part 3: Minimum 1 page  
             Part 4: minimum 2 pages
             Part 5: minimum 1 page

Submit 1 document per part

2)¨******APA norms
          All paragraphs must be narrative and cited in the text- each paragraphs
          Bulleted responses are not accepted
          Dont write in the first person 
          Dont copy and pase the questions.
          Answer the question objectively, do not make introductions to your answers, answer it when you start the paragraph

Submit 1 document per part

3)****************************** It will be verified by Turnitin (Identify the percentage of exact match of writing with any other resource on the internet and academic sources, including universities and data banks) 
********************************It will be verified by SafeAssign (Identify the percentage of similarity of writing with any other resource on the internet and academic sources, including universities and data banks)

4) Minimum 3 references per part not older than 5 years

5) Identify your answer with the numbers, according to the question. Start your answer on the same line, not the next
Example:
Q 1. Nursing is XXXXX
Q 2. Health is XXXX

6) You must name the files according to the part you are answering: 
Example:
Part 1.doc 
Part 2.do
__________________________________________________________________________________
Parts 1 and 2 are the same question, however you must answer both questions with references and different writing always addressing them objectively, that is, as if you were two different people. Similar responses in wording or references will not be accepted.
 
Part 1: Advance Primary Care 

Read the following article (Check file 1)
https://www.napnap.org /sites/default/files/userfi les/for_providers/NP_ Malpractice_FAQ_NS O.pdf
1) List the elements of malpractice and give examples of each element in professional nursing practice, including ways to avoid or lessen the potential of future malpractice cases.
 
Part 2: Advance Primary Care 

Read the following article (Check file 1)
https://www.napnap.org /sites/default/files/userfi les/for_providers/NP_ Malpractice_FAQ_NS O.pdf
1) List the elements of malpractice and give examples of each element in professional nursing practice, including ways to avoid or lessen the potential of future malpractice cases.

Part 3: Pharmacology

Contraception
J.L., a 27-year-old account executive, presents to the family medicine office for her annual checkup with her primary care provider. She has no significant past medical history except heavy menses. Her medications include calcium carbonate 500 mg orally twice a day and a multivitamin daily. She exercises regularly. Her family history is significant for cardiovascular disease (her father had an MI at age 54 and died of a further MI at age 63). She notes that she has been dating her current partner for approximately 5 months. She is interested in a reliable form of contraception. After discussing the various contraceptive options, she is here for contraceptive counseling.
Questions:
1. Before prescribing an OCP regimen, what tests or examinations would you like to perform?
2. Identify three different contraceptive regimens that could be chosen for J.L. Note their differences and why you chose them.
3. Identify the potential side effects that need to be relayed to J.L. Note especially those side effects for which J.L. should seek immediate medical care.

Part 4: Health Assessment

The needs of the pediatric patient differ depending on age, as do the stages of development and the expected assessment findings for each stage. Examine the needs of a school-aged child between the ages of 5 and 12 years old and discuss the following:

1. Compare the physical assessments among school-aged children (5 and 12 years old). 
2. Describe how you would modify assessment techniques to match the age and developmental stage of the child.

Choose a child between the ages of 5 and 12 years old.

Sex: Male
Age: 8YO

 3. Identify the age of the child and describe the typical developmental stages of children that age.

Applying developmental theory based on Erickson

4. Explain how you would developmentally assess the child. 
a. Include how you would offer explanations during the assessment, strategies you would use to gain cooperation, and potential findings from the assessment.

Part 5: Nursing Leadership

1. Describe the fundamental principles of servant leadership. 
2. Present two qualities of servant leadership and explain how they support interprofessional communication in providing patient care.

NAPNAP POSITION STATEMENT
Position Statement on
Malpractice Insurance for
Nurse Practitioners
The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practi-
tioners (NAPNAP) recognizes that nurse practitioners
(NPs) need access to affordable and adequate malprac-
tice insurance, also called medical professional liability
insurance, to protect themselves and their patients.

Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are
gaining practice autonomy and responsibility in an in-
creasingly complex health care delivery system. NPs
have a responsibility to protect the individuals they
care for and themselves by practicing within the scope
of practice as mandated by state statute, rules, and reg-
ulations (Balestra, 2012; National Council of State
Boards of Nursing, 2014). It is recognized that as the
workforce has grown, the number of malpractice
claims involving nurse practitioners has increased;
however, the percentage of claims has remained
stable and is the lowest among health care
professionals (LeBuhn & Swankin, 2010; Miller, 2011).

Malpractice insurance protects health care providers
and the individuals for whom they provide care. The in-
clusion of license protection defense is another impor-
tant component of malpractice insurance that is
designed to protect NPs in the event of regulatory or dis-
ciplinary action (Balestra, 2012). Although an employer
may provide malpractice insurance coverage, it may
not fully protect individual NPs or their APRN license.
Adopted by the National Association of Pediatric Nurse

Practitioners’ Executive Board on February 17, 2015. This

document replaces the 2009 NAPNAP Position Statement on

Malpractice Insurance for Nurse Practitioners.

All regular position statements from the National Association of

Pediatric Nurse Practitioners automatically expire 5 years after

publication unless reaffirmed, revised, or retired at or before
that time.

Correspondence: NAPNAP National Office, 5 Hanover Square,

Suite 1401, New York, NY 10004.

J Pediatr Health Care. (2015) 29, A11-A12.

0891-5245/$36.00

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedhc.2015.04.015

www.jpedhc.org
Therefore, NPs are encouraged to analyze employer-
provided coverage to determine whether carrying indi-
vidual malpractice insurance is warranted (Barry, 2006;
Buppert, 2007; Liguori & Jones, 2006). NPs have a
responsibility to understand the malpractice risks in
their own work setting and to be aware of the type of
coverage afforded by their employer-provided and/or
individual malpractice policies.
NPs provide a range ofservicesand activities that have

the potential to affect their patients, positively or ad-
versely. Patients have legal rights to receive adequate
and appropriate diagnosis and treatment or referral to
a specialist that is consistent with the expected stan-
dard of care (National Association of Insurance
Commissioners, 2014). If they believe they have not re-
ceived such care from the NP, they can file a legal claim
against him/her. Complaints may also be registered at
state Boards of Nursing (Balestra, 2012). Some of these
claims may be warranted, and if the claim is so judged,
malpractice insurance can pay for the NP’s legal fees
and pay the patient damages awarded and legal fees
that are assessed by the defense and prosecution, subject
to the limits of the policy or policies. Any claims resulting
in a monetary settlement or judgment are also subject to
reportingintheNationalPractitioner Data Bank(NPDB).
The NPDB is subject to review with licensure, hiring, or
certification to participate in government programs such
as Medicaid. Provider identification within the NPDB is
viewed as reflective of negative past performance and
has implications foranNP’sfuture practice opportunities
(Jordan, Quraishi, & Liao, 2013). Therefore, it is impor-
tant for protection of both the NP and the public that
NPs understand the implications of both malpractice
claims and settlements and for NPs to be covered by ad-
equate malpractice insurance.
NAPNAP advocates that:

� All NPs should have access to affordable malpractice
insurance. NAPNAP supports affordable insurance
rates for NPs.
July/August 2015 11A

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedhc.2015.04.015

http://www.jpedhc.org

� Employers have a responsibility to provide malprac-
tice insurance coverage to NP employees.

� NPs have the responsibility to understand the Nursing
Practice Act and malpractice laws in the state(s) in
which they are licensed and/or practicing.

� NPs have the responsibility to understand the mal-
practice coverage requisites applicable to their provi-
sion of professional health care services.

� NPs have an obligation to consider the role of license
protection coverage as it relates to their malpractice
insurance policy.

� NPs should obtain continuing education in risk as-
sessment and reduction on a regular basis.

� NP programs should incorporate education related to
risk assessment, liability, and malpractice insurance
coverage.

� Research and data collection related to NP malprac-
tice liability should continue and be published to im-
prove NPs’ knowledge about malpractice.

� NPs should support legislation at the state and na-
tional level to ensure malpractice insurance is afford-
able and obtainable for all health care providers.

NPs have a responsibility to ensure that the malprac-
tice insurance coverage applicable to their provision of
professional health care services is sufficient to protect
themselves and the individuals they care for. NAPNAP’s
mission is to empower pediatric nurse practitioners and
their health care partners to enhance child and family
12A Volume 29 � Number 4
health through practice, leadership, advocacy, educa-
tion and research.

The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practi-
tioners would like to acknowledge the contribution of
the Professional Issues Committee and the following
members for their contribution to the revision of this
statement: Kristin Hittle, MSN, RN, CPNP-AC, CCRN,
Professional Issues Chair; Melanie Balestra, MSN,
CPNP, JD; Mary Chesney, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, NAP-
NAP President; and Tracy Nichols, MSN, CPNP.
REFERENCES
Balestra, M. (2012). The best defense for registered nurses and nurse

practitioners: Understanding the disciplinary process. Journal
of Nursing Law, 15(2), 39-44.

Barry, P. (2006). Perspectives on private practice. Professional
malpractice insurance and practicing within professional guide-
lines. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 42, 201-203.

Buppert, C. (2007). Arguments for having your own insurance. The
Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 3, 590-592.

Jordan, L. M., Quraishi, J. A., & Liao, J. (2013). The national practi-
tioner data bank: What CRNAs need to know. AANA Journal,
81(2), 97-102.

LeBuhn, R., & Swankin, D. A. (2010). Reforming scopes of practice:
A white paper. Retrieved from https://www.ncsbn.org/
ReformingScopesofPractice-WhitePaper.pdf

Liguori, R., & Jones, D. (2006). Report of the NAPNAP malpractice
insurance survey: Do you know if you are covered? Journal of
Pediatric Health Care, 20, 143-147.

Miller, K. (2011). Malpractice: Nurse practitioners and claims re-
ported to the national practitioner data bank. The Journal for
Nurse Practitioners, 7(9), 761-763, 773.

National Association of Insurance Commissioners. (2014). Medical
professional liability insurance. Retrieved from http://www.
naic.org/cipr_topics/topic_med_mal.htm

National Council of State Boards of Nursing. (2014). Nurse practice
acts guide and govern nursing practice. Retrieved from
https://www.ncsbn.org/npa-toolkit.htm
Journal of Pediatric Health Care

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Position Statement on Malpractice Insurance for Nurse Practitioners
References

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