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This assignment is designed to have you consider and select the most appropriate research design for your research questions.Using the provided worksheet, you will reexamine each of your three research questions and determine what the most appropriate research design is to best answer that question. For example, let’s say you. want to know “What is the effect of daily meditation on one’s perceived level of stress?” In order to best answer this question, what research design would be best? Would it be a survey? What about a single subject design? Would it be a focus group? Could you run a true experiment? What research design would give you the answers you are looking for? It is important to note that you could possibly use several different research designs to answer a single research question. Using the question above, you could use a focus group and gather a group of individual who meditate daily to ask them questions about how daily meditation has affected their stress levels, or you could design an experiment where you compare the stress levels of a treatment group of individual who include meditation in their daily routines against those of a control group who does not do any meditation. Both approaches can answer your question, but one will likely be better suited for the types of information you want to find out. Therefore, be sure to provide the rationale for why you chose one approach over another. Be sure to use the text as well as the supplemental materials provided in the module to better understand your design options and their respective pros and cons. In the spaces provided, you’ll select the best design for each of your three research questions and provide your rationale for why you selected each. It is likely that each question will require a unique design, so it is important to be familiar with all of your options. Once you complete your worksheet, you’ll submit it via Canvas by the due date. You can submit it as a typed Word document or a handwritten and scanned PDF. Either works for me. I will attach the worksheet to this. I will send some pictures from the book as well
research_design_exercise_worksheet__1_.pdf

research_design_exercise_rubric__1_.docx

data_collection_chart__2_.pdf

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Research Design Exercise Worksheet
Restate you first research question here:
Given your question, what would be the most appropriate design for your research project?
Restate your second research question here:
Given your question, what would be the most appropriate design for your research project?
Restate your second research question here:
Given your question, what would be the most appropriate design for your research project?
Research Design Exercise Rubric
Student Name:
High Quality Work
Quality Work
Needs Improvement
14-15
Points Awarded
Work exceeded
expectations
Work was
exceptionally
thoughtful
High level of clarity in
response
Displayed the learning
process very effectively
12-13
Points Awarded
Work met expectations
Excellent use of style
and grammar
Few/Minor style and
grammar mistakes
9-11
Points Awarded
Work fell short of
expectations
Additional
thoughtfulness is
needed
Response lacked some
clarity
More effort is needed
to clearly display
learning process
Numerous style and
grammar mistakes
Work was thoughtful
Response was clear
Displayed the learning
process effectively
Needs Significant
Improvement
0-8
Points Awarded
Work failed to meet
expectations
Work did not reflect
the level of
thoughtfulness needed
Response was unclear
Learning process was
largely/entirely unclear
Significant style and
grammar issues
Total Points Earned:
Comments:
If you have any questions about this assignment and/or the grade you have earned, please feel free to
reach out to me directly. I am happy to discuss this further with you.
 
 
Examples of Data Collection Methods
 
 
Method
Purpose
Advantages
Challenges
Resources/
Capacity
Required
Low
Questionnaires,
surveys,
checklists
When need to quickly
and/or easily get a lot
of information from
people in a nonthreatening way.






Can complete anonymously
Inexpensive to administer
Easy to compare and to analyze
Can administer to many people
Can get lots of data
Can be adapted into many forms
(online, paper, verbal)
• Many sample questionnaires
already exist (but you may still
need to adapt them)
• Might not get careful
feedback
• Question wording can bias
respondent’s answers
• Impersonal
• Doesn’t always get the full
story
• Adapting existing surveys
takes time
Interviews
When you want to fully
understand someone’s
impressions or
experiences, or learn
more about their
answers to
questionnaires
• Get a full range and depth of
information
• Develop relationships with
stakeholders
• Can be flexible
• Can take a lot of time
• Can be hard to analyze or
compare
• Can be costly
• Interviewer can bias
responses
ModerateHigh
Document review
When you want an
impression of how
strategy operates
without interrupting
strategy; from review
of applications,
finances, memos,
minutes, etc.
• Get comprehensive and
historical information
• Doesn’t interrupt strategy or
stakeholder’s routine in
strategy
• Information already exists
• Often takes a lot of time
• Information can be
incomplete
• Need to be clear about what
you are looking for
• Not flexible means to get
data; data is restricted to what
already exists
Moderate
Observation
To gather accurate
information about how
a strategy actually
operates, particularly
about processes
• View operations of a strategy
or a PSC (Prevention Systems
Capacity) as they are actually
occurring
• Can adapt to events as they
occur
High
Focus Groups
Explore a topic in
depth through group
discussion, e.g. about
reactions to an
experience or
suggestion,
understanding
common complaints,
etc.; useful in
evaluation and
marketing
• Quickly and reliably get
common impressions
• Can be efficient way to get
much range and great depth of
information in a short time
• Can convey key information
about strategy
• Can be difficult to interpret
seen behaviors
• Can be complex to categorize
observations
• Can influence behaviors of
strategy participants
• Can be expensive
• Can be hard to analyze
responses
• Need a good facilitator for
safety and closure
• Difficult to schedule 6-8
people together
Case studies
To fully understand or
depict stakeholder’s
experiences in
strategy, and conduct
comprehensive
examination through
cross comparison of
cases (if cases are
comparable)
• Fully depicts stakeholder’s
experience in strategy input,
process and results
• Powerful means to portray
strategy to outsiders
• Usually quite time consuming
to collect, organize and
describe
• Represents depth of
information, rather than
breadth.
High
ModerateHigh
 
 
The information included in this handout was adapted from the CDC PIES for IPV/SV Prevention Education Step. For more
information, please contact Wendi Siebold (wendi.lyn1@gmail.com or 206-962-0260) (Updated 11.7.11)
 
 
Examples of Data Collection Methods
 
 
 
Pros and Cons of Quantitative Data
Pros
You can collect a wide variety of information
quickly
Provides a quick “snapshot” of results for busy
decision makers
You can do statistical analysis that predict
changes
Statistics are seen as credible data to decision
makers
Tools may already exist that have been tested and
‘validated’ for use in research studies
Cons
You may miss out on a more in-depth
understanding of what you are studying
Does not enhance the information shared with
decision-makers
Statistics are not always feasible or appropriate
for program evaluation
Does not allow for community knowledge to be
shared
Data collection tools (sometimes) are not easy to
develop or adapt and may not be culturally
appropriate
Pros and Cons of Qualitative Data
Pros
You gain a more in-depth understanding of what
you are evaluating
Enhance the information shared with decision
makers
Data collection tools are (usually) easier to
develop
Allows more community knowledge to be shared
Can be more culturally appropriate
Cons
Can be resource-intensive and time-consuming
Data collection requires more staff training
Data analysis may require more staff training
Subject to misinterpretation (Quantitative methods
are not immune to this, however)
May be so specific that it is hard to draw broad
conclusions across populations or contexts.
 
The information included in this handout was adapted from the CDC PIES for IPV/SV Prevention Education Step. For more
information, please contact Wendi Siebold (wendi.lyn1@gmail.com or 206-962-0260) (Updated 11.7.11)

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