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Take the Barriers to Exercise quiz from the Harvard Health Letter [Harvard Medical School] by clicking on the attachment below — Harvard Health Letter: Barriers to Physical Activity Quiz. Once you have completed the quiz, you can get a better assessment of your preferences, habits, and possible areas for activity improvement. The quiz requires that you take your results for the first 3 questions and sum them; THEN, take the next 3 questions and sum them — there are 7 areas identified in this quiz that affords you a brief ‘scoring’ of your responses and where you are relative to physical activity. Below this section are various suggestions for overcoming physical inactivity — similar to those presented in your textbook. After having taken the quiz that is attached below from Harvard health Letter (from above activity), you were asked to examine your personalized results and begin to develop a behavior contract related to increasing your level of physical activity (see an example on pg 75, figure 4.4).Please submit a one-page summary of your your own behavior contract to improve/increase your level of physical activity…identifying what your current level of behavioral engagement is for physical activity and ‘where’ you will begin to make changes and ‘contract’ with yourself to improve your exercise/physical activity.
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Harvard Heart Letter
What are your barriers to exercise?
Published: January, 2012
If you want to exercise but can’t seem to do it, this quiz may help you identify some of
the barriers that keep you from being more active.
Barriers to Being Active Quiz
What keeps you from being more active? Take the following quiz to find out.
Directions: Listed below are reasons that people give to describe why they do not get
as much physical activity as they think they should. Please read each statement and
circle the number of the statement that most applies to you:
How likely are you to say:
Very
likely
Somewhat
likely
Somewhat
unlikely
Very
unlikely
1. My day is so busy now, I just don’t think I 3
can make the time to include physical
activity in my regular schedule.
2
1
0
2. None of my family members or friends
like to do anything active, so I don’t have a
chance to exercise.
3
2
1
0
3. I’m just too tired after work to get any
exercise.
3
2
1
0
4. I’ve been thinking about getting more
exercise, but I just can’t seem to get started.
3
2
1
0
5. I’m getting older so exercise can be risky.
3
2
1
0
6. I don’t get enough exercise because I have 3
never learned the skills for any sport.
2
1
0
7. I don’t have access to jogging trails,
swimming pools, bike paths, et.
3
2
1
0
8. Physical activity takes too much time
3
away from other commitments—time, work,
family, etc.
2
1
0
9. I’m embarrassed about how I will look
when I exercise with others.
3
2
1
0
10. I don’t get enough sleep as it is. I just
couldn’t get up early or stay up late to get
some exercise.
3
2
1
0
11. It’s easier for me to find excuses not to
exercise than to go out to do something.
3
2
1
0
12. I know of too many people who have
hurt themselves by overdoing it with
exercise.
3
2
1
0
13. I really can’t see learning a new sport at
my age.
3
2
1
0
14. It’s just too expensive. You have to take
a class or join a club or buy the right
equipment.
3
2
1
0
15. My free times during the day are too
short to include exercise.
3
2
1
0
16. My usual social activities with family or 3
friends to not include physical activity.
2
1
0
17. I’m too tired during the week and I need
the weekend to catch up on my rest.
2
1
0
3
18. I want to get more exercise, but I just
3
can’t seem to make myself stick to anything.
2
1
0
19. I’m afraid I might injure myself or have
a heart attack.
3
2
1
0
20. I’m not good enough at any physical
activity to make it fun.
3
2
1
0
21. If we had exercise facilities and showers 3
at work, then I would be more likely to
exercise.
2
1
0
Follow these instructions to score yourself:

Enter the circled number in the spaces provided, putting together the number for
statement 1 on line 1, statement 2 on line 2, and so on.

Add the three scores on each line. Your barriers to physical activity fall into one or more
of seven categories: lack of time, social influences, lack of energy, lack of willpower,
fear of injury, lack of skill, and lack of resources. A score of 5 or above in any category
shows that this is an important barrier for you to overcome.
____ + ____ + ____ = ______________________
1815Lack of time
____ + ____ + ____ = ______________________
2916Social influence
____ + ____ + ____ = ______________________
31017Lack of energy
____ + ____ + ____ = ______________________
41118Lack of willpower
____ + ____ + ____ = ______________________
51219Fear of injury
____ + ____ + ____ = ______________________
61320Lack of skill
____ + ____ + ____ = ______________________
71421Lack of resources
Suggestions for Overcoming Physical Activity Barriers
Lack of time
Identify available time slots. Monitor your daily activities for one week. Identify at least three
30-minute time slots you could use for physical activity.
Add physical activity to your daily routine. For example, walk or ride your bike to work or
shopping, organize school activities around physical activity, walk the dog, exercise while you
watch TV, park farther away from your destination, etc.
Make time for physical activity. For example, walk, jog, or swim during your lunch hour, or
take fitness breaks instead of coffee breaks.
Select activities requiring minimal time, such as walking, jogging, or stair climbing.
Social influence
Explain your interest in physical activity to friends and family. Ask them to support your
efforts.
Invite friends and family members to exercise with you. Plan social activities involving
exercise.
Develop new friendships with physically active people. Join a group, such as the YMCA or a
hiking club.
Lack of energy
Schedule physical activity for times in the day or week when you feel energetic.
Convince yourself that if you give it a chance, physical activity will increase your energy level;
then, try it.
Lack of motivation
Plan ahead. Make physical activity a regular part of your daily or weekly schedule and write it
on your calendar.
Invite a friend to exercise with you on a regular basis and write it on both your calendars.
Join an exercise group or class.
Fear of injury
Learn how to warm up and cool down to prevent injury.
Learn how to exercise appropriately considering your age, fitness level, skill level, and health
status.
Choose activities involving minimum risk.
Lack of skill
Select activities requiring no new skills, such as walking, climbing stairs, or jogging.
Exercise with friends who are at the same skill level as you are.
Find a friend who is willing to teach you some new skills.
Take a class to develop new skills.
Lack of resources
Select activities that require minimal facilities or equipment, such as walking, jogging, jumping
rope, or calisthenics.
Identify inexpensive, convenient resources available in your community (community education
programs, park and recreation programs, worksite programs, etc.).
Weather conditions
Develop a set of regular activities that are always available regardless of weather (indoor
cycling, aerobic dance, indoor swimming, calisthenics, stair climbing, rope skipping, mall
walking, dancing, gymnasium games, etc.)
Look on outdoor activities that depend on weather conditions (cross-country skiing, outdoor
swimming, outdoor tennis, etc.) as “bonuses”-extra activities possible when weather and
circumstances permit.
Travel
Put a jump rope in your suitcase and jump rope.
Walk the halls and climb the stairs in hotels.
Stay in places with swimming pools or exercise facilities.
Join the YMCA or YWCA (ask about reciprocal membership agreement).
Visit the local shopping mall and walk for half an hour or more.
Bring a small tape recorder and your favorite aerobic exercise tape.
Family obligations
Trade babysitting time with a friend, neighbor, or family member who also has small children.
Exercise with the kids-go for a walk together, play tag or other running games, get an aerobic
dance or exercise tape for kids (there are several on the market) and exercise together. You can
spend time together and still get your exercise.
Hire a babysitter and look at the cost as a worthwhile investment in your physical and mental
health.
Jump rope, do calisthenics, ride a stationary bicycle, or use other home gymnasium equipment
while the kids are busy playing or sleeping.
Try to exercise when the kids are not around (e.g., during school hours or their nap time).
Encourage exercise facilities to provide child care services.
Retirement years
Look upon your retirement as an opportunity to become more active instead of less. Spend
more time gardening, walking the dog, and playing with your grandchildren. Children with
short legs and grandparents with slower gaits are often great walking partners.
Learn a new skill you’ve always been interested in, such as ballroom dancing, square dancing,
or swimming.
Now that you have the time, make regular physical activity a part of every day. Go for a walk
every morning or every evening before dinner. Treat yourself to an exercycle and ride every
day while reading a favorite book or magazine.
Source: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s Web
site on Nutrition & Physical Activity.

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